Roman Mithraism

Mithras or Mica (Michael), a Persian then Roman Sun God

Mithras is a Greek form of the name of an Indo-European god, Mithra or Mitra (Old Persian, Mica). Roman writers believed that Mithraism came from Persia and that Mithraic iconography represented Persian mythology. Mithraism was once called the Mysteries of Mithras or Mysteries of the Persians.

In Rome, Mithras was a sun god, and, in Persia, he was a god of the morning sun. The Roman Mithras killed the Primeval Bull, mirroring the death of a Primeval Bull in the Persian religion.

The Roman Mithras wore a Phrygian cap. Phrygia was in the Persian empire for 200 years. Modern scholars have traced Mithras in Persian, Mittanian and Indian mythology. The Mitanni gave us the first written reference to Mithras in a treaty with the Hittites. These and much more suggest a continuity of belief from India to Rome in a myth of a sun god killing a bull.

The Romans attributed their Mithraic Mysteries to Persian or Zoroastrian sources relating to Mithra, although more recently those mysteries have been qualified as a distinct Roman product.

Mithra is the origin of the word mitre – the priestly hat most notably worn by the Popes of this world.

 

Source: Wikipedia

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