Reckoning

To establish by calculation

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Boney & Talley. The Corsican carcase-butcher’s reckoning day. Cartoon showing interior of a slaughterhouse, with Napoleon as the butcher, holding cleaver and knife. He is being restrained by Talleyrand. Shown are animals and bodies of animals representing Germany, Italy, Prussia, Russia, England, Switzerland, Spain, and Holland. [Image: British Museum; Text: British Cartoon Prints Collection, 1803 – Library of Congress]

Note the common origin of both “reckoning” and “regal” from the root “reg”, meaning to direct in a straight line or to rule:

reckon (v.) c. 1200, recenen, from Old English gerecenian “to explain, relate, recount,” from Proto-Germanic *(ga)rekenojan (source also of Old Frisian rekenia, Middle Dutch and Dutch rekenen, Old High German rehhanon, German rechnen, Gothic rahnjan “to count, reckon”), from Proto-Germanic *rakina “ready, straightforward,” from PIE *reg “to move in a straight line,” with derivatives meaning “direct in a straight line, rule” (see regal).

The Online Etymology Dictionary goes on:

  • intransitive sense: to make a computation — c. 1300
  • to hold an impression or opinion: “I reckon”; “he reckoned” — c. 1600
    • formerly in literary use, became associated with a ‘provincial’ (even vulgar) U.S. Southern dialect

Reckoning:

  • the act or an instance of calculating the amount or outcome of something: as an account or bill; a computation; a calculation, such as that of a ship’s position (e.g. dead reckoning)

  • the act of judging something

  • a summing up

Screenshot (204)

[Image: flickr]

Words to use in place of reckoning: calculation, estimation, addition, bill, check, charge, ciphering, cost, count, debt, due, estimate, fee, figuring, score, settlement, and summation.
Are your ready for the settlement? Are you ready for the day of reckoning? Are you ready to be directed in a straight line?
Are you reg-ready?
– ♣ –
Further Reading:
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