Genesis

The Book of Genesis 1:1-5

King James Version (KJV)

In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters. And God said, Let there be light: and there was light. And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness. And God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And the evening and the morning were the first day.

1959 Geneva Bible (GNV)

In the [b]beginning God created the heaven and the earth. And the earth was [c][d]without form and void, and [e]darkness was upon the [f]deep, and the Spirit of God [g]moved upon the [h]waters. Then God said, Let there be light: And there was [i]light. And God saw the light that it was good, and God separated [j]the light from the darkness. And God called the Light, Day, and the darkness he called Night. [k]So the evening and the morning were the first day.

Complete Jewish Bible (CJB)

In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. The earth was unformed and void, darkness was on the face of the deep, and the Spirit of God hovered over the surface of the water. Then God said, “Let there be light”; and there was light. God saw that the light was good, and God divided the light from the darkness. God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. So there was evening, and there was morning, one day.

English Standard Version (ESV)

In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth. The earth was without form and void, and darkness was over the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God was hovering over the face of the waters. And God said, “Let there be light,” and there was light. And God saw that the light was good. And God separated the light from the darkness. God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And there was evening and there was morning, the first day.

Tree of Life Version (TLV)

In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. [a] Now the earth was chaos and waste, darkness was on the surface of the deep, and the Ruach Elohim was hovering upon the surface of the water.[b] Then God said, “Let there be light!” and there was light. God saw that the light was good. So God distinguished the light from the darkness. God called the light “day,” and the darkness He called “night.” So there was evening and there was morning—one day.

Who wrote the flood story?

Overview of the Book of Genesis

Genesis by the numbers (pictures, actually)

x1952-69, Adam is Tempted by Eve, Artist: Tissot, Photographer: John Parnell, Photo © The Jewish Museum, New York

x1952-69, Adam is Tempted by Eve, Artist: Tissot, Photographer: John Parnell, Photo © The Jewish Museum, New York

x1952-70, God's Curse, Artist: Tissot, Photographer: John Parnell, Photo © The Jewish Museum, New York

x1952-70, God’s Curse, Artist: Tissot, Photographer: John Parnell, Photo © The Jewish Museum, New York

x1952-79, The Animals Enter the Ark, Artist: Tissot, Photographer: John Parnell, Photo © The Jewish Museum, New York

x1952-79, The Animals Enter the Ark, Artist: Tissot, Photographer: John Parnell, Photo © The Jewish Museum, New York

x1952-81, The Dove Returns to Noah, Artist: Tissot, Photographer: John Parnell, Photo © The Jewish Museum, New York

x1952-81, The Dove Returns to Noah, Artist: Tissot, Photographer: John Parnell, Photo © The Jewish Museum, New York

x1952-82, Noah's Sacrifice, Artist: Tissot, Photographer: John Parnell, Photo © The Jewish Museum, New York

x1952-82, Noah’s Sacrifice, Artist: Tissot, Photographer: John Parnell, Photo © The Jewish Museum, New York

x1952-83, Shem, Ham and Japeth, Artist: Tissot, Photographer: John Parnell, Photo © The Jewish Museum, New York

x1952-83, Shem, Ham and Japeth, Artist: Tissot, Photographer: John Parnell, Photo © The Jewish Museum, New York

x1952-88, Abram's Counsel to Sarai, Artist: Tissot, Photographer: John Parnell, Photo © The Jewish Museum, New York

x1952-88, Abram’s Counsel to Sarai, Artist: Tissot, Photographer: John Parnell, Photo © The Jewish Museum, New York

 

 

Abraham’s Journey from Ur to Canaan, József Molnár (1821–1899) [Wikimedia Commons]

Jacob Encountering Rachel with her Father’s Herds, Joseph von Führich (c. 1836) – Uploaded by User:Tetraktys [Wikimedia Commons]

Tower of Babel, from Athanasius Kircher’s Turris Babel (Amsterdam, 1679) – Wikimedia Commons

Isaac blessing Jacob, Jose de Ribera (c. 1637) – Uploaded by User:Enrique Cordero [Wikimedia Commons, as at December 19, 2015]

Joseph’s Coat Brought to Jacob, Giovanni Andrea de Ferrari (c. 1640) – as uploaded by User:Wmpearl [Wikimedia Commons]

Joseph recognized by his brothers, by Léon Pierre Urbain Bourgeois, 1863 oil on canvas, at the Musée Municipal Frédéric Blandin, Nevers [Wikimedia Commons]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s