From Petroglyph to Paper

An only craft comes to rest on a reef — part of a recently submerged  mountain range of present-day Armenia. The earth is rocky barren. As waters gradually recede, quadrupeds of various type are escorted off the lone vessel, some by twos and others yet seven at a time.

Overseeing this steady evacuation are eight Homo sapiens sapiens. Together they make a lone community: a small island within an unending expanse of sea.

Handy in artesian skills and replete with the oral tradition of their forebears, the anthropoids settle. And as the ebb prevails, they stretch into the land and slowly prosper into a fully-fledged commune — multiplying and now pervading the surrounding steppe.

Speaking the one language, with a single dialect, they come to inscribe its symbols into local igneous rock. And things go well, for a time. First one village and then another appear, and in time a primitive civilisation takes form.

The anthropoids soon find themselves at some distance from—and some height above—the water level, at a plateau shy of a peak. With room to expand, pockets of communes and tribes spread farther apart. All the while oversight is yet retained by a single elder.

But population expansion ushers in inevitable hierarchical governance: and before long there is a primordial administration taking shape. Not before long, emerging difference in custom and preference—small at first—come to define each tribe.

And as they settle into routine—flourishing, as they do, one generation to the next—disputes territorial and disagreements arise. Included in these objections is the very custom and nature of worship. And it is not long before a disgruntled individual foments disquiet and invites bitterness. Others, still, become envious of the rule.

Eventually, the minorities make good their consternation and make their own way. Some travel south and then east, putting distance between themselves and the main group. Heading southeast, as they do, they finally arrive at a rich alluvial plain. And there they set camp.


Featured Image (when shown): Petrogliph-Ughtasar-Armenia [Wikimedia Commons]

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