Not so, far away in time

Perhaps Mark Gane was referring to the Kingdom, when he wrote this. Perhaps he “was [day] dreaming when I wrote this”. Or perhaps he really was watching wallpaper ink dry (see below). Either way: I feel like a guest on “Rage“, counting down songs. Either way, more and more it seems, Echo Beach is where I’d rather be.  Either way, I do this, all in the name of love.

I know it’s out of fashion
And a trifle uncool
But I can’t help it
I’m a romantic fool
It’s a habit of mine
To watch the sun go down
On Echo beach, I watch the sun go down

On a silent summer evening
The sky’s alive with light
Building in the distance
Surrealistic sight
On Echo Beach
Waves make the only sound
On Echo Beach
There’s not a soul around


Annotations

Echo Beach” is a song recorded by the Canadian group Martha and the Muffins in 1979. Echo Beach, as mentioned in the song, does not refer to a real beach but is rather a symbolic notion of somewhere the narrator would rather be, somewhere ‘far away in time’. In reality, the song was created while Gane was working checking wallpaper for printing faults. He found the work rather dull and his mind drifted to times he would like to live over again. One such time was an evening spent at Sunnyside Beach on the shoreline of Lake Ontario in Toronto in summer. In 1977, Echo Beach was a reference made to a faded time and place gone in the lyrics of the song “Hiroshima Mon Amour” by the band Ultravox.

—Wikipedia (as accessed February 27, 2017)

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